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unixronin: Galen the technomage, from Babylon 5: Crusade (Default)
Unixronin

December 2012

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March 28th, 2011

unixronin: Galen the technomage, from Babylon 5: Crusade (Default)
Monday, March 28th, 2011 07:57 am

Thomas Paine wrote, in The Rights of Man:

If, from the more wretched parts of the old world, we look at those which are in an advanced stage of improvement, we still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping the spoil of the multitude.  Invention is continually exercised, to furnish new pretenses for revenues and taxation.  It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without tribute.

"Invention is continually exercised, to furnish new pretenses for revenues and taxation."  Now, where in the US have we seen that happening ...

Oh, wait.  Where, lately, in the US, have we NOT seen that happening?

Not too many places, are there?

Give government the power to spend, and once it realizes it can spend what it wants and the voting public can't or won't stop it, it will spend and spend and spend.  It will tax anything that moves so that it can spend.  It will award itself new powers so that it can spend.  It will print money so that it can spend.  And once it starts printing money to spend it, it will print money until the money is worthless, beggaring everyone else in the process — because it naturally reserves to itself the right to print money.

What happens to a society, an economy, when its money becomes so worthless it's not worth the trouble to pick it up out of the gutter?

Well, just look at Zimbabwe, Hungary, Yugoslavia...

It has been written that the power to tax is the power to destroy.  But so is the power to spend without limit.  And if you are "limited" by a ceiling that you have granted yourself the power to simply raise every time it looks like you might be about to hit it ... well, what kind of a limit is that?